Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘V-Mail’ Category

From 1st Lt. Dewain Silvester 0-1050923
BtrY.C. 778AAA AwBn(sP)
A.P.O. 403 c/o Postmaster
New York, New York

To: Mrs. Dewain Silvester
Box 11,
Parker, Idaho
U.S.A.

In France, 6, January, 1945

Precious little family?

Observe that there is still a question mark.  I hope and pray that you are well and happy.  You know how very  much I love you.  You’re such a wonderfully perfect wife.  I’m so proud.

I just took time out to listen to a German propaganda program in English.  They paint is just as well for their people as we do for ours.  Perhaps soon the truth can be known.  Most of the stations we can get are of German origin.  the Allied Expeditionary Forces program from the British Broadcasting Company is our old stand by with delightful music and news from home.

Forgive me, please, for getting off on such a subject.  More better I should tell you that the chow over here is excellent.  I’ve got to hand it to the supply boys.  We have certainly been taken care of.  The only thing we lack for happiness, outside of being home in peace, of course, is mail.  Now, don’t worry.  It’ll get here.  Soon.  I hope mine to you are spaced well enough to keep you from worrying.  I’ll say Goodnight, now.  There was a busy day behind and another ahead.  I love you with all my heart, my darling.

Dewain

Grandpa’s first letter of the new year, and he’s still wondering about his new baby, who’s two weeks old now.  It’s nice to hear he’s eating well, considering what he’s in the middle of doing (in the middle of things in the middle of winter doesn’t sound like anybody’s idea of a good time).

Our next letter from Grandpa comes in February, and then we start having Grandma’s letters back too.  I can’t wait to hear her side of the story.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

From 1st Lt. Dewain Silvester 0-1050923
BtrY.C.778AAAAwBn(sP)
A.P.O. 655 c/o Postmaster
New York, New York


To: Mrs. Dewain Silvester
Box 11,
Parker, Idaho
U.S.A.

Luxembourg, 26 December 1944

Precious Little Family,

This is letter number fifteen, I think.  Anyhow, darlings, please be well and happy right now and love me lots.  Was your Christmas nice?  Did it snow?  Did you get anything from your old man?  What did you get?  What did everyone get?  I was thinking of you so hard when you should have been eating Christmas dinner.  You could never imagine what I was doing.

As you see, your old man has been getting around a little.  No mail or word as yet.  It’s good I had too little time to worry.  Have you been getting a trickle of letters from me?  I surely hope so.  Darling, you ‘ll never know how terrifically much I love you.  You’re so doggone wonderful.

Have the folks been over recently?  How is everyone?  Are you kept pretty busy?  Be sure to take good care of yourself.  These letters must be a disappointment to you, sweetheart.  Can you forgive me.  As time permits, I will do better.  Never forget how terribly much you mean to me.

Yours, Dewain

There is so much unsaid in this short V-Mail.  I wonder where Grandpa was – in a tent or a Quonset hut, a proper building, or even outside somewhere.  It was winter, in the middle of the Battle of the Bulge, which I know little about in my dusty memory.  My dad (Happy Birthday – you’re born by now, even if Grandpa didn’t know it yet) gave me a book to read called “The Longest Winter” by Alex Kershaw.  It’s subtitled “The Battle of the Bulge and the Epic Story of World War II’s Most Decorated Platoon” (which isn’t Grandpa’s platoon – but they were out there, too).  I haven’t started it yet . . . but  hope to get some back story knowledge to supplement my letters here.

By December 26th, my Dad, baby Rick, was 4 days old . . . I wonder how grandma was feeling, and how much of Christmas dinner she was interested in, and how tired she was.  There’s so much left to imagination and my knowledge and personal experience.

Hope everybody had a warm and quiet Christmas, even as we remember Christmas 64 years ago.

Read Full Post »

From 1st Lt. Dewain Silvester 0-1050923
BtrY.C.778AAAAwBn(sP)
A.P.O. 655 c/o Postmaster
New York, New York
To: Mrs. Dewain Silvester
Box 11,
Parker, Idaho
U.S.A.

England, Letter Number Twelve

My Darling Wife,

I hope and pray that you are well and happy.  If things went according to your schedule, the baby was born four days ago.  It is good that I simply have had no time to walk the floor and worry as other expectant fathers do because my wait is so much longer.  The most important message I await is that you are all right.  Then of course, as the the traditional proud father I want to know of our wonderful offspring.  You dominate all my thoughts.  I sincerely wish I could tell you how much I love you.  I hope so desperately that this war will soon end so that I can return to my beautiful family and be the kind of husband and father I want to be.  Know always of my desires and I love you so deeply.  I shall write again soon and try to do more justice to the feelings of my heart and mind.  I’ll say goodbye for now to the most beautifully perfect wife in the world.  Take care of yourself always.

Your wandering husband, Dewain.

This short letter is the first one in my binder, is written on a form that says “V ···—MAIL U.S. Government Printing Office: 1942 * 16-28143-4.”  Because the baby’s birth is pending, I’m dating this letter in December, 1944.

UPDATED NOTES on 12/21:

When I very started this project, 11/11/08, this was the first letter in my binder.  Since then, I rearranged the letters to be in chronological order.  This is one of the very few letters without a date, and one of the very few with a number on it.  Context lets me place it here . . .because I have letters from 12/5 and 12/26, 12/27 and then 1/6.  We’ll be out of England, going to Luxembourg and France.

Read Full Post »